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Wedlocked : the perils of marriage equality : how African Americans and gays mistakenly thought the right to marry would set them free Preview this item
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Wedlocked : the perils of marriage equality : how African Americans and gays mistakenly thought the right to marry would set them free

Author: Katherine Franke
Publisher: New York : New York University Press, [2015]
Series: Sexual cultures.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
The staggering string of victories by the gay rights movement's campaign for marriage equality raises questions not only about how gay people have been able to successfully deploy marriage to elevate their social and legal reputation, but also what kind of freedom and equality the ability to marry can mobilize. Wedlocked turns to history to compare today's same-sex marriage movement to the experiences of newly  Read more...
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Details

Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Katherine Franke
ISBN: 9781479815746 1479815748
OCLC Number: 909198573
Description: xi, 275 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
Contents: Introduction --
Freedom by marriage --
Fluid families : "it is probable that the soldier had two wives" --
Boots next to the bed : getting caught in marriage's web --
Am I my brother's keeper? : policing our own with marriage --
The afterlife of racism and homophobia --
What marriage equality teaches us about gender and sex --
Appendix: A progressive call to action for married queers.
Series Title: Sexual cultures.
Responsibility: Katherine Franke.

Abstract:

The staggering string of victories by the gay rights movement's campaign for marriage equality raises questions not only about how gay people have been able to successfully deploy marriage to elevate their social and legal reputation, but also what kind of freedom and equality the ability to marry can mobilize. Wedlocked turns to history to compare today's same-sex marriage movement to the experiences of newly emancipated black people in the mid-nineteenth century, when they were able to legally marry for the first time. Maintaining that the transition to greater freedom was both wondrous and perilous for newly emancipated people, Katherine Franke relates stories of former slaves' involvements with marriage and draws lessons that serve as cautionary tales for today's marriage rights movements. While "be careful what you wish for" is a prominent theme, they also teach us how the rights-bearing subject is inevitably shaped by the very rights they bear, often in ways that reinforce racialized gender norms and stereotypes. Franke further illuminates how the racialization of same-sex marriage has redounded to the benefit of the gay rights movement while contributing to the ongoing subordination of people of color and the diminishing reproductive rights of women. Like same-sex couples today, freed African-American men and women experienced a shift in status from outlaws to in-laws, from living outside the law to finding their private lives organized by law and state licensure. Their experiences teach us the potential and the perils of being subject to legal regulation: rights--and specifically the right to marriage--can both burden and set you free.--Publisher website.
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"[R]igorous, historical."-Los Angeles Review of Books "A persuasive and provocative addition to scholarship on the history and the influence of marriage."-Women's Review of Books "A provocative Read more...

 
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