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The new Negro : the life of Alain Locke

Author: Jeffrey C Stewart
Publisher: New York, NY : Oxford University Press, [2018]
Edition/Format:   Print book : Biography : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
"A tiny, fastidiously dressed man emerged from Black Philadelphia around the turn of the century to mentor a generation of young artists including Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, and Jacob Lawrence and call them the New Negro--the creative African Americans whose art, literature, music, and drama would inspire Black people to greatness. In The New Negro : The Life of Alain Locke, Jeffrey C. Stewart offers the  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: Biography
Biographies
History
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Stewart, Jeffrey C., 1950-
New Negro.
Oxford : Oxford University Press, [2018]
(DLC) 2017026908
(OCoLC)989520051
Named Person: Alain Locke; Alain Locke; Alain Locke
Material Type: Biography
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Jeffrey C Stewart
ISBN: 9780195089578 019508957X 0199723311 9780199723317 0190652853 9780190652852
OCLC Number: 982092783
Description: xii, 932 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
Contents: Part I. The Education of Alain Locke. A Death and a Birth --
A Black Victorian Childhood --
Child God and Black Aesthete --
An Errand of Culture at Harvard College, 1904-1905 --
Locke's Intellectual Awakening, 1905-1907 --
Going for the Rhodes --
Oxford Contrasts --
Black Cosmopolitan --
Paying Second-Year Dues at Oxford, 1908-1909 --
Italy and America, 1909-1910 --
Berlin Stories --
Exile's Returns --
Race Cosmopolitan Comes Home, 1911-1912 --
Radical Sociologist at Howard University, 1912-1916 --
Rapprochement and Silence : Harvard, 1916-1917 --
Fitting in Washington, D.C., 1917-1922 --
Part II. Enter the New Negro. Rebirth --
Mother of a Movement, Mothered in Return, 1922-1923 --
Europe Before Egypt --
Egypt Bound --
Renaissance Self-Fashioning in 1924 --
The Dinner and the Dean --
Battling the Barnes --
Looking for Love and Finding the New Negro --
Harlem Issues --
The New Negro and Howard --
The New Negro and The Blacks --
Beauty or Propaganda? --
Black Curator and White Momma --
Langston's Indian Summer --
The American Scholar --
On Maternalism --
Part III. Metamorphosis. The Naked and the Nude --
The Saving Grace of Realism --
Bronze Booklets, Gold Art --
Warn A Brother --
The Riot and the Ride --
Transformation --
Two Trains Running --
The Queer Toussaint --
The Invisible Locke --
FBI, Haiti, and Diasporic Democracy --
Wisdom de Profundis --
The New Negro Lives --
Epilogue.
Responsibility: Jeffrey C. Stewart.

Abstract:

"A tiny, fastidiously dressed man emerged from Black Philadelphia around the turn of the century to mentor a generation of young artists including Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, and Jacob Lawrence and call them the New Negro--the creative African Americans whose art, literature, music, and drama would inspire Black people to greatness. In The New Negro : The Life of Alain Locke, Jeffrey C. Stewart offers the definitive biography of the father of the Harlem Renaissance, based on the extant primary sources of his life and on interviews with those who knew him personally. He narrates the education of Locke, including his becoming the first African American Rhodes Scholar and earning a PhD in philosophy at Harvard University, and his long career as a professor at Howard University. Locke also received a cosmopolitan, aesthetic education through his travels in continental Europe, where he came to appreciate the beauty of art and experienced a freedom unknown to him in the United States. And yet he became most closely associated with the flowering of Black culture in Jazz Age America and his promotion of the literary and artistic work of African Americans as the quintessential creations of American modernism. In the process he looked to Africa to find the proud and beautiful roots of the race. Shifting the discussion of race from politics and economics to the arts, he helped establish the idea that Black urban communities could be crucibles of creativity. Stewart explores both Locke's professional and private life, including his relationships with his mother, his friends, and his white patrons, as well as his lifelong search for love as a gay man. Stewart's thought-provoking biography recreates the worlds of this illustrious, enigmatic man who, in promoting the cultural heritage of Black people, became--in the process--a New Negro himself"--
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This biography is a work of profound learning and keen insight, with deep wells of empathy. * Daniel Matlin, Literary Review *

 
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